Four common misbeliefs around meditation

Meditation is a practice of self-discovery, and like any conscious practice, it takes time to make it a consistent practice. When starting, it’s quite common to fall for some limited belief about meditation. Limited ideas that can, in fact, be a reason why some give up on their practice, which is why it is crucial to address them in an early stage when devoting oneself to the practice of meditation.

Sadly, there is plenty of jargon floating around that supports these ideas. Perhaps you have heard the phrase “empty the mind,” it’s a practice to focus the mind, and by doing so, we learn to control our thoughts, detach from our thoughts and evolve from there. Below are three other common misbelief:

  • Meditation means empty the mind/fighting thoughts.

No. There is no fight, no repressing, and no forcefulness about meditation. Fighting with thoughts (or any other type of mental impression), will simply strengthen them, and lead you to an agitated state. The only thing we do in meditation is to consciously withdraw our attention from engaging with thoughts, by focusing it on something else. With this, the mind slowly calms down. Meditation is simply the process of continuously regulating attention.

  • The meditation was unsuccessful because I didn’t go deep.”

Meditation isn’t something one should measure nor compare. There might be days where the mind is continuously yapping, so redirecting the focus gets a little challenging. You can have been a daily meditator and still experience the chatter of the brain.

  • Meditation is a spiritual/religious practice.

Meditation is an ancient practice, and it was indeed created/discovered within religious contexts. However, for most techniques – especially as practiced in the West – there is nothing mostly religious about them. In other words: you can practice meditation without needing to believe in anything. A Christian or Muslim can practice it, without any conflict with their faith. The same goes for atheists and agnostics. Practicing meditation will not make you religious, just as doing stretches or yoga will not make you a Yogi.

Think about mediation as washing your brain. You shower at least once a day (hopefully), so why not wash your brain. We are constantly thinking, judging, evaluating. Even in sleep. Our brain needs time to chill. Literally.

If you’d like to learn more about meditation in a grounded manner that fosters self-compassion, please join the online Meditation & Self-compassion workshop. The workshop is a self-study program that assists you in becoming a conscious practitioner of meditation while supporting you in the process. 

Meditation is a very old practice, and it was indeed created/discovered within religious contexts. However, for most techniques – especially as practiced in the West – there is nothing essentially religious about them. In other words: you can practice meditation without needing to believe in anything. A Christian or Muslim can practice it, without any conflict with their faith. The same goes for atheists and agnostics. Practicing meditation will not make you religious, just as doing stretches or yoga will not make you a Yogi.

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ONLINEWORKSHOP

The Meditation & Self-Compassion is an 7–week self-study workshop that is centered around creating a loving and kinder relationship with yourself. In this workshop, you’ll learn the foundation of creating a consistent meditation practice while enhancing your connection with your true self through self-compassion.

You will be guided through a guided meditations and prompted to investigate the the blocks of your heart and limiting belief structures that is prohibiting you from having a heartfelt relationship with yourself and the world around you.

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